Category: Practice management

Does your practice need a social responsibility program?

One of the areas that is very important to a recruitment candidate when they are looking for a job is, ‘does the practice show some level of social responsibility?’.

People like to work for a practice that has a purpose other than simply being a business. Of course, in healthcare there are lots of examples of social responsibility where doctors are giving their time and energy above and beyond to patients. However, ensuring there are some other activities that are happening can help to secure, retain and motivate an employee.

RWS implements a social responsibility program for you that is simple and can include areas such as:

1. Having a policy around genuine hardship.

2. Having a charitable activity each year.

3. Being aware of the environment and taking measures to reduce environmental impact. E.g., minimising disposable products and water use.

These three example areas can be included at your practice to help motivate staff and feel like they are working for an organisation with a higher purpose.

Looking after the psychosocial welfare of your employees is also part of your obligations as an employer. Operating a social responsibility program can go a long way to show that you are interested in the welfare of the community along with your staff member.

Get in touch today to learn more about how RWS can help implement a Social Responsibility Program in your practice.

Letting your patients know if you are moving practice

Something we are often asked by doctors who are moving to a new practice is “am I allowed to let my patients know?”

This presents an interesting scenario because on the one hand, you must show appropriate due diligence in letting patients know you have moved so they may contact you if they wish. However, within your contract there may be clauses to say that you cannot solicit patients.

Here are some tips to consider before acting in this space.

#1 Seek legal advice
Talking to a professional in this space is worthwhile when there is a contract involved.

#2 Alternative channels
You can let patients know you have moved without contacting them directly and this can be done via website, a homepage or through social media to local forums. Be aware if you set up a homepage or a new website that it will take some weeks for search engines to pick up the information. If the practice you are moving from is agreeable, a sign at the practice, both at reception and on the front door can further advise.

#3 Call your insurer
This is also a space where a call to your insurer can be helpful. This is to check whether you are meeting the requirements in letting your patients know about your move.

RWS puts a process in place to help you with the implementation, design and strategy for all of the above suggestions.

Contact us for further information if you are moving.

Practice Health Check

Is it time for a numbers “health check” at your practice?

Many specialists do not have processes in place to attain and review their monthly data.

As a starting point you need to regularly monitor categories such as those listed below.

This data will help you:

1. Make informed marketing decisions
2. Select and appoint staff appropriately

Referrer Marketing – Getting referrers and retaining them

Referrals are the lifeblood of your practice. It is of the utmost importance that you have systems in place to monitor and manage your referrer relationships. Appropriate medical marketing is crucial in the competitive environment of private practice.
We see many doctors who are paying the price for taking their eye off the ball, and not paying attention to their medical marketing. It is devastating to find your numbers dropping because others around you are marketing more efficiently. Don’t let this happen to you.

Award rates changes

The 1 July changes that will impact your Practice.

On 1 July 2017, the minimum wage in the Health Professionals and Support Services Award 2010 increased by 3.3%.

What does this mean to you?

For any practice that has employees covered by the Health Professionals and Support Services Award 2010, and are paying at or close to the minimum wage under the award, it is important to review and increase the employee’s minimum wages.

It is crucial that practices increase staff pay, if they receive award wages, by the 3.3%, with weekly wages rounded to the nearest 10 cents.